JUNE 16 2015 17:35h

Standard of living in Croatia among lowest in EU

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The standard of living in Croatia in 2014 was among the lowest in the European Union, along with the standard of living in Romania and Bulgaria, show estimates on consumption and GDP per capita published on Tuesday by the EU's statistical office Eurostat.

Actual Individual Consumption (AIC) is a measure of the material welfare of households. AIC per capita expressed in Purchasing Power Standards in Croatia in 2014 was as much as 41% below the EU average, according to preliminary Eurostat estimates. In 2013, it was 39% below the average.

Croatia's GDP per capita last year was also 41% below the EU average and in 2013 it was 39% below the average.

Eurostat publishes estimates on actual individual consumption and GDP per capita for all EU countries twice a year, in June and December.

The only two countries to report a level of AIC below the EU average in 2014 were Romania and Bulgaria, where AIC was 45% and 51% below the EU average respectively.

The highest AIC per capita expressed in Purchasing Power Standards was recorded in Luxembourg, 40% above the EU average. Germany and Austria exceeded the average by slightly more than 20%.

In Denmark, Belgium, Sweden, Great Britain, Finland, France and the Netherlands AIC per capita was 10-20% above the EU average.

Italy was around the average, while Ireland, Cyprus and Spain had AIC per capita of up to 10% below the average.

In Greece, Portugal and Lithuania AIC per capita was 10-20% below the average and in Malta, the Czech Republic, Poland, Slovenia and Slovakia, it was 20-30% below.

As for GDP per capita, it was the highest in Luxembourg, slightly more than two and a half times above the EU average. It was the lowest in Bulgaria and Romania, 55% and 46% below the EU average respectively.

Italy was closest to the EU average in terms of GDP per capita. Aside from Luxembourg, an above-average GDP per capita was also reported by Germany, Austria, Denmark, Belgium, Sweden, Great Britain, Finland, France, the Netherlands and Ireland.